Literacy Across the Curriculum

 

We believe that literacy is at the forefront of all learning, whatever the subject; raising standards in literacy means supporting and encouraging students of all ability. Effective comprehension and communication are vital skills that students need to make progress in their education, but they are also vital if our students are to go on and succeed in the work place.

Improved levels of literacy will raise the achievement of all students by reducing the main barrier to attainment. An inability to access material restricts a student’s power to develop key skills. Similarly, an inability to communicate ideas limits a student’s capacity to display ideas and understanding. A high level of literacy empowers a student to engage with and learn from a whole range of texts, as well as giving them the skills to demonstrate their progress.

 

At the Cheadle Academy we aim:

  • To raise the standards of students’ reading, writing, speaking and listening skills, promoting high aspirations for students’ attainment.
  • To strengthen the link between literacy and learning.
  • For literacy to be taught systematically and consistently in all subject areas, across the curriculum, in contexts that are relevant and meaningful to learners.
  • For literacy feedback to be consistent across the Academy and to provide students with opportunities and guidance for improvement where weaknesses are identified.
  • To provide intervention for individuals and groups whose literacy levels are below those expected for their age, in particular boys, SEN and those eligible for free school meals through addressing their specific literacy needs.
  • To promote an enthusiastic reading culture encompassing students, parents/carers and staff where reading for pleasure is a high priority.
  • To augment literacy collaboration between and within the feeder primary schools, the Academy and the 6th Form, using mentorship and support networks.

What is Literacy?

“…schools should ensure that all pupils communicate effectively. This plainly includes their ability to apply their reading and writing skills successfully and to speak articulately in a range of contexts and for different purposes.”                                                                                                                                                                Ofsted October 2011